Posted by: Indonesian Children | September 7, 2009

Arches of the foot

Arches of the foot
Skeleton of foot. Medial aspect.
Skeleton of foot. Lateral aspect.
   
   

The arches of the foot are formed by the tarsal and metatarsal bones, and strengthened by ligaments and tendons, allow the foot to support the weight of the body in the erect posture with the least weight.

The arches are categorized as transverse and longitudinal arches of the foot.

 

 

 

 

 

Longitudinal arches

The Longitudinal arch of the foot can be broken down into several smaller arches:

  • The main arches are the antero-posterior arches, which may, for descriptive purposes, be regarded as divisible into two types—a medial and a lateral.

Medial arch

  • The medial arch is made up by the calcaneus, the talus, the navicular, the three cuneiforms, and the first, second, and third metatarsals.
  • Its summit is at the superior articular surface of the talus, and its two extremities or piers, on which it rests in standing, are the tuberosity on the plantar surface of the calcaneus posteriorly and the heads of the first, second, and third metatarsal bones anteriorly. The chief characteristic of this arch is its elasticity, due to its height and to the number of small joints between its component parts.
  • Its weakest part, i. e., the part most liable to yield from overpressure, is the joint between the talus and navicular, but this portion is braced by the plantar calcaneonavicular ligament, which is elastic and is thus able to quickly restore the arch to its pristine condition when the disturbing force is removed. The ligament is strengthened medially by blending with the deltoid ligament of the ankle-joint, and is supported inferiorly by the tendon of the Tibialis posterior, which is spread out in a fanshaped insertion and prevents undue tension of the ligament or such an amount of stretching as would permanently elongate it.
  • The arch is further supported by the plantar aponeurosis, by the small muscles in the sole of the foot, by the tendons of the Tibialis anterior and posterior and Peronæus longus, and by the ligaments of all the articulations involved.

Lateral arch

  • The lateral arch is composed of the calcaneus, the cuboid, and the fourth and fifth metatarsals.
  • Its summit is at the talocalcaneal articulation, and its chief joint is the calcaneocuboid, which possesses a special mechanism for locking, and allows only a limited movement.
  • The most marked features of this arch are its solidity and its slight elevation; two strong ligaments, the long plantar and the plantar calcaneocuboid, together with the Extensor tendons and the short muscles of the little toe, preserve its integrity.

Fundamental longitudinal arch

  • While these medial and lateral arches may be readily demonstrated as the component antero-posterior arches of the foot, yet the fundamental longitudinal arch is contributed to by both, and consists of the calcaneus, cuboid, third cuneiform, and third metatarsal: all the other bones of the foot may be removed without destroying this arch.

Transversal arch

  • In addition to the longitudinal arches the foot presents a series of transverse arches.
  • At the posterior part of the metatarsus and the anterior part of the tarsus the arches are complete, but in the middle of the tarsus they present more the characters of half-domes the concavities of which are directed downward and medialward, so that when the medial borders of the feet are placed in apposition a complete tarsal dome is formed.
  • The transverse arches are strengthened by the interosseous, plantar, and dorsal ligaments, by the short muscles of the first and fifth toes (especially the transverse head of the Adductor hallucis), and by the Peronæus longus, whose tendon stretches across between the piers of the arches.

 

 

Supported  by
CLINIC FOR CHILDREN 

Yudhasmara Foundation 

JL Taman Bendungan Asahan 5 Jakarta Indonesia 102010

phone : 62(021) 70081995 – 5703646 

http://childrenclinic.wordpress.com/ 

 

 

Clinical and Editor in Chief :

DR WIDODO JUDARWANTO 

email : judarwanto@gmail.com 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                            

Information on this web site is provided for informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. You should not use the information on this web site for diagnosing or treating a medical or health condition. You should carefully read all product packaging. If you have or suspect you have a medical problem, promptly contact your professional healthcare provider. 

Copyright © 2009, Clinic For Children Information Education Network. All rights reserved.


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